Formula 1 2019: The teams

All you need to know about the teams in 2019 (all facts correct as of the start of the season).

Alfa Romeo – Kimi Raikkonen (7), Antonio Giovinazzi (99)

Taking over from Sauber, the Alfa Romeo name returns to Formula 1 for the first time since 1985. All of Alfa Romeo’s 10 wins came in the first two years of the Formula 1 championship – 1950 and 1951 – with Giuseppe Farina becoming the world champion in 1950 and Juan Manuel Fangio a year later.

For 2019 they have the most experienced driver in F1 in the form of 39-year-old Kimi Raikkonen, partnered by 25-year-old Italian Antonio Giovinazzi, who starts the season with only two grands prix to his name as he replaces Marcus Ericsson.

Races started: 112 Pole positions: 12
Wins: 10 Podium places: 26 Championships: 2
2018 position (as Sauber): 8th 2018 wins/podiums (as Sauber): 0/0 2018 best (as Sauber): 6th – Azerbaijan (Leclerc)

Ferrari – Sebastian Vettel (5), Charles Leclerc (16)

Charles Leclerc in testing<!–<!–[if lte IE 8]><![endif]–>

The 2018 season promised so much for Ferrari, but in the end Sebastian Vettel finished 88 points behind world champion Lewis Hamilton with the team 84 points adrift of Mercedes in the Constructors’ Championship.

They have a new pairing for 2019 as 21-year-old Charles Leclerc swaps seats with Raikkonen, who is now at Alfa Romeo, to partner four-time world champion Vettel.

Races started: 970 Pole positions: 219
Wins: 235 Podium places: 751 Championships: 16
2018 position: 2nd 2018 wins/podiums: 6/24 2018 best: 1st – six races (5 Vettel, 1 Raikkonen)

Haas – Romain Grosjean (8), Kevin Magnussen (20)

Haas<!–<!–[if lte IE 8]><![endif]–>

It is the same again for American team Haas as Romain Grosjean and Kevin Magnussen keep their places for 2019. Magnussen got the bragging rights in 2018 as he came ninth in the championship, with Grosjean 14th.

Races started: 62 Pole positions: 0
Wins: 0 Podium places: 0 Championships: 0
2018 position: 5th 2018 wins/podiums: 0/0 2018 best: 4th – Austria (Grosjean)

McLaren – Carlos Sainz (55), Lando Norris (4)

A frustrating year for McLaren in 2018 saw Fernando Alonso retire from F1 as his car was not competitive enough. He is replaced by compatriot Carlos Sainz, who moves from Renault, with the Spaniard joined at the team by 19-year-old Briton Lando Norris, the runner-up in the 2018 Formula 2 Championship.

Races started: 842 Pole positions: 155
Wins: 182 Podium places: 485 Championships: 8
2018 position: 6th 2018 wins/podiums: 0/0 2018 best: 5th – Australia (Alonso)

Mercedes – Lewis Hamilton (44), Valtteri Bottas (77)

Once again Mercedes were supreme in 2018 with Lewis Hamilton winning the world title again and the team becoming the constructors champions for the fifth successive season.

But question marks remain over his team-mate Valtteri Bottas, who faced team orders in Russia and was told to give the race lead to Hamilton, before the Finn had a disappointing end to the campaign, coming only fifth in each of the final four races of 2018.

Races started: 189 Pole positions: 101
Wins: 87 Podium places: 179 Championships: 5
2018 position: 1st 2018 wins/podiums: 11/24 2018 best: 1st – 11 races (all Hamilton)

Racing Point – Sergio Perez (11), Lance Stroll (18)

Racing Point is the new name for the team formerly known as Force India, who were bought out by a consortium led by Canadian billionaire Lawrence Stroll.

Despite the off-track turmoil, Force India still did remarkably well in 2018, ending seventh in the standings, despite having the 59 points in the Constructors’ Championship they earned in the opening 12 races of the season wiped from the records after going into administration. They would have come fifth overall if they had been able to keep all their pre-administration points. Lawrence’s son Lance moves over from Williams to join Sergio Perez at the team.

Races started: 0 Pole positions: 0
Wins: 0 Podium places: 0 Championships: 0
2018 position (as Force India): 7th 2018 wins/podiums (as Force India): 0/1 2018 best: 3rd – Azerbaijan (Perez)

Red Bull – Max Verstappen (33), Pierre Gasly (10)

A season of what might have been for Red Bull in 2018. The pairing of Max Verstappen and Daniel Ricciardo won four races between them, but at least one of their cars (sometimes both) failed to finish in 10 of the 21 races, with Ricciardo not finishing eight times.

The Australian has now gone to Renault with Pierre Gasly getting a promotion from Toro Rosso to join Verstappen.

Races started: 265 Pole positions: 60
Wins: 59 Podium places: 161 Championships: 4
2018 position: 3rd 2018 wins/podiums: 4/13 2018 best: 1st – 4 races (2 Ricciardo, 2 Verstappen)

Renault – Daniel Ricciardo (3), Nico Hulkenberg (27)

Nico Hulkenberg and Daniel Ricciardo<!–<!–[if lte IE 8]><![endif]–>

There is a new face at Renault this year as Daniel Ricciardo – having tired of reliability issues at Red Bull and also playing second fiddle to Max Verstappen – moves to the French team to join up with Nico Hulkenberg.

Races started: 362 Pole positions: 51
Wins: 35 Podium places: 100 Championships: 2
2018 position: 4th 2018 wins/podiums: 0/0 2018 best: 5th – 2 races (Sainz, Azerbaijan and Hulkenberg, Germany)

Toro Rosso – Daniil Kvyat (26), Alexander Albon (23)

Toro Rosso<!–<!–[if lte IE 8]><![endif]–>

A surprise pairing for 2019 as Russian Daniil Kvyat, who dropped out of Formula 1 during the 2017 season, is back in the sport and partnered by 22-year-old newcomer Alexander Albon, the London-born and Suffolk-educated Thai who finished third in the Formula 2 Championship in 2018.

Races started: 247 Pole positions: 1
Wins: 1 Podium places: 1 Championships: 0
2018 position: 9th 2018 wins/podiums: 0/0 2018 best: 4th – Bahrain (Gasly)

Williams – George Russell (63), Robert Kubica (88)

Williams<!–<!–[if lte IE 8]><![endif]–>

Last season was a disaster for Williams as they finished bottom of the constructors’ championship after picking up only seven points, with their drivers finishing in the top 10 in just two of the 21 races.

This year they have a completely new line-up. Robert Kubica is back racing in F1 after a nine-year absence and is joined by Formula 2 champion George Russell, a 20-year-old Englishman.

Races started: 711 Pole positions: 128
Wins: 114 Podium places: 312 Championships: 9
2018 position: 10th (last) 2018 wins/podiums: 0/0 2018 best: 8th – Azerbajian (Stroll)

This content was provided by the BBC

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close